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Tuesday, February 05, 2019

Plan S: Less publications, but more quality, more reusable? Yes, please.

If you look at opinions published in scholarly journals (RSS feed, if you like to keep up), then Plan S is all 'bout the money (as Meja already tried to warn us):


No one wants puppies to die. Similarly, no one wants journals to die. But maybe we should. Well, the journals, not the puppies. I don't know, but it does make sense to me (at this very moment):

The past few decades has seen a significant growth of journals. And before hybrid journals were introduced, publishers tended to start new journals, rather than make journals Open Access. At the same time, the number of articles too has gone up significantly. In fact, the flood of literature is drowning researchers and this problem has been discussed for years. But if we have too much literature, should we not aim for less literature? And do it better instead?

Over the past 13 years I have blogged on many occasions about how we can make journals more reusable. And many open scientist can quote you Linus: "given enough eyeballs, all bugs are shallow". In fact, just worded differently, any researcher will tell you exactly the same, which is why we do peer review.
But the problem here is the first two words: given enough.

What if we just started publishing half of what we do now? If we have an APC-business model, we have immediately halved(!) the publishing cost. We also save ourselves from a lot of peer-review work, reading of marginal articles.

And what if we just the time we freed up for actually making knowledge dissemination better? Make journals articles actually machine readable, put some RDF in them? What if we could reuse supplementary information. What if we could ask our smartphone to compare the claims of one article with that of another, just like we compare two smartphones. Oh, they have more data, but theirs has a smaller error margin. Oh, they tried it at that temperature, which seems to work better than in that other paper.

I have blogged about this topic for more than a decade now. I don't want to wait another 15 years for journal publications to evolve. I want some serious activity. I want Open Science in our Open Access.

This is one of my personal motives to our Open Science Feedback to cOAlition S, and I am happy that 40 people joined in the past 36 hours, from 12 countries. Please have a read, and please share it with others. Let your social network know why the current publishing system needs serious improvement and that Open Science has had the answer for years now.

Help our push and show your support to cOAlition S to trigger exactly this push for better scholarly publishing: https://docs.google.com/document/d/14GycQnHwjIQBQrtt6pyN-ZnRlX1n8chAtV72f0dLauU/edit?usp=sharing

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